katydid

What is this burr sticking to my shirt?

small green burrs

garden burrs

The Question: I’m trying to identify the burr/seed in this photo. I think it’s from a weed I’ve been pulling from my flower garden. I pulled off about 100 from my shirt. They grip like iron!

Submitted by: Jane, southwestern Connecticut, USA

(click on photos and graphics to expand)

small yellow flower

wood avens

The Short Answer: This appears to be the fruit of a wildflower in the genus Geum, possibly Geum urbanum, also known as the wood aven. The avens are in the rose family and are related to cinquefoils and strawberries. Many Geum species have burrs that readily catch in the fur of animals or the clothing of people.

More Information: Because “adult” plants don’t generally move, they have evolved ways to move their pollen, seeds and spores. Botanists generally classify methods of moving seeds as dispersal by wind (anemochory), dispersal by water (hydrochory), and dispersal by animals (zoochory). Dispersal by animals is further divided into internal seed transportation (endozoochory), which is what happens when animals swallow fruit and seeds, and external seed transportation (epizoochory), when plant burrs use hooks, barbs, or spines to stick to the outsides of their animal transportation.

The trick for a plant that wants to use a human gardener or other animal to transport its seeds is that its seeds need to hang on long enough to go somewhere, but not so long that they never get dropped onto soil so they can grow. The other problem is that the plant has very little control over where the seed lands. But there are possibilities for how a plant could evolve some control over the location where its seeds get sowed. If you imagine, for example, a plant that puts its burrs in a location where mice are likely to pick them up, that could result in a different pattern of sowing than that of another plant whose burrs are located where deer are likely to pick them up.

You could also imagine that different kinds of burrs might hang on more or less tightly, which would have an impact on how far a seed travels from the parental location before it is likely to fall off.  The optimum for each plant species will probably be different.  If, for example, a plant requires a very specific soil type, it might be best if seeds don’t travel very far from parents because that is likely to result in them being dropped in a soil type different from that where the parent is thriving.  On the other hand, a plant that can grow in almost any soil might spread more effectively if its seeds travel a longer way from the parent, as long as it doesn’t disperse so far that it finds itself alone, without a nearby mate for pollination.  Species that can self-pollinate might be able to disperse even further, since a single plant can colonize a new location.

small yellow flower and stem

common avens

One scientist who studies this phenomenon is Dr. Mason W. Kulbaba, a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Calgary. Dr. Kulbaba’s larger area of study is about the evolution of flowers, but as part of that interest, he published a study on the properties of eight species of plants that carry burrs, including common avens (Geum aleppicum). Dr. Kulbaba and his co-authors tested the burrs and their ability to stick to the fur of five different animals (bear, raccoon, deer, mouse, bison) and one set of cotton pants. One of the things he was looking for was whether it seemed like burrs were specialized to specific types of animals. In this study, the only strong association he found was that common avens burrs stuck to mouse fur much better than to any other animal in the study. This is a very limited survey of animals, and limited evidence, but it would be interesting if the burrs of avens are adapted specifically to stick to the fur of rodents.

Interestingly, Dr. Kulbaba found that the stickiest burrs were those of two invasive species, common burdock (Arctium minus) and bluebur (Lappula echinata). They were also the two that stuck to pants the best. No wonder they’ve been able to hitch a ride around the world. And if those avens burrs in Jane’s Connecticut garden seemed to “grip like iron,” she should be thankful her garden isn’t full of burdock and bluebur!

Sources:

Kulbaba, M W, Tardif, J C, & Staniforth, R J. (2009). Morphological and ecological relationships between burrs and furs. The American Midland Naturalist, 161(2), 380-391.

Photo of Geum urbanum by Badlydrawnboy22 – Own work. Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons – http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Geum_urbanum.jpg#/media/File:Geum_urbanum.jpg

Cite this article as: Pelletier, TC. (March 25, 2015). What is this burr sticking to my shirt? Retrieved from http://askanaturalist.com/what-is-this-burr-sticking-to-my-shirt/ on April 18, 2015.

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Review of Tracks & Sign of Insects

coverIt has been a while since I posted answers to questions, and I apologize for that. I’m hoping to get back into the swing of things over the next couple of weeks. And I thought I’d start with a quick review of a unique book, Tracks & Signs of Insects and Other Invertebrates, a Guide to North American Species by Charley Eiseman and Noah Charney. The book is comprised of 523 pages of photographs and descriptions of eggs, droppings, burrows, and more, on land, in water, and suspended in air. There are many guidebooks for North American insects, many books that will help you identify tracks and signs of mammals, and a fair number that will help you with birds, reptiles and amphibians. But for North America, at least, I don’t believe there is anything else like this book to help you identify the tracks and signs left all around us by insects and other invertebrates.

The book is organized by type of sign, with chapters such as Eggs, Cocoons, and Galls, and also by places to find signs, with chapters such as Signs on Twigs, Stems and Stemlike Structures and another that shows Signs on Rocks and Shells. As I leafed through the pages, I found myself making note to watch more carefully for various patterns and markings the next time I’m out in the woods, or even just out in the backyard. If you’re interested in the insects, spiders, worms and other tiny creatures that really run things on planet earth, you will find this book useful and fascinating.

One warning: if you’re easily creeped out, skip the chapter on parasitism. It’s fascinating and it shows a wide range of signs you can find that show how invertebrates parasitize each other – and how everyone gets parasitized by fungi – but on a tiny scale, it’s also pretty gruesome.

The book was published in 2010 by Stackpole Books. It won the 2010 National Outdoor Book Award and is for sale on Amazon and other book sites, or you can buy it directly from authors Eiseman and Charney’s Northern Naturalist website at http://www.northernnaturalists.com/invert_tracks.html. If you want to get a somewhat manic taste of the kinds of things this book covers, take a look at the videos on the Northern Naturalists homepage: http://www.northernnaturalists.com/.

Eiseman, C., Charney, N. (2010). Tracks & Signs of Insects and Other Invertebrates, a Guide to North American Species. Mechanicsburg, PA: Stackpole Books.

Cite this article as: Pelletier, TC. (March 20, 2015). Review of Tracks & Sign of Insects Retrieved from http://askanaturalist.com/review-of-tracks-sign-of-insects/ on April 18, 2015.

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Ducky questions

mallard drake flying

mallard drake flying

Because they are such common and charismatic birds now found nearly worldwide, and many people enjoy seeing them and adopting them, at least in spirit, I frequently get questions about mallards (Anas platyrhynchos). What follows is a small collection of mallard questions and answers.

(click on photos and graphics to expand)
mallard duckling

mallard duckling

1. Can this mallard hen feed her young? There is a group of mallards in my back yard/pond. There is a female with a broken bill. It appears that she has a mate, but I worry. If she has eggs will she be able to feed her young?

Submitted by: Anne, Virginia, USA

Anne, I’m sorry to hear about the female mallard.  The good news is that mallard ducklings are able to feed themselves within 24 hours of hatching.  The only thing the mother duck does is lead them to places where they can find food. So my concern would be whether the mother can feed herself.  Does she seem to be doing that?

Anne’s response: “Yes, she can feed herself, the tip of her tongue sticks out to one side but otherwise she seems to be doing well.  I put cracked corn out every morning and I make sure that she has a little extra, which seems to be working, considering she looks like she has gotten a little bigger and is holding her own against the other ducks.”

Most wildlife managers strongly discourage the feeding of wild ducks, but it’s hard to argue with your compassionate impulse for this injured hen. I hope she continues to do well. And if she does nest in the spring, her ducklings should be fine.

mallard hen

mallard hen

2. How many females per male? What is the best ratio to keep mallards if you are wanting them to lay eggs for babies? In other words, how many females per male would you put together?

Submitted by: Steve, USA

Steve, thanks for your question.  Unfortunately, I’m not a duck expert, and I’ve never raised ducks.  My site is really interested in the behavior of wild ducks.  I would think that one male could probably take care of a lot of females, but you might want to check sites like this one: http://www.duckhobby.com/

mallard hen with turtles

mallard hen

3. How to protect a nest? Hi, I live on a lake and feed mallard ducks daily. Love ‘em! There are three that return every day to be fed. I named them Peter, Paul and Mary. Mary built her current nest in the cover of several large plants directly under my front window. The only reason I knew she was there was because my dog “showed” me one day. I was devastated to come out of my home this morning and find several eggs broken and scattered all over my sidewalk and driveway. I was terrified that something happened to Mary too. Once I found her to be okay, my concern grew because my fear was that there was an animal that got to the nest. Sadly, the broken eggs revealed feathers and then my protective instinct kicked in. I know, and understand that this is how nature works, but I so want to protect Mary and what’s left of her nest. If it was another animal who got to the nest, now they know where they can find her again. Isn’t there something that can be done? According to your article, she leaves the nest once in the morning and once in the afternoon. Can I cover her and the nest at night so she is protected? What can I do?

Submitted by: Cookie, USA

Cookie, I’m sorry to hear about the trauma there.  Even when a predatory situation is perfectly natural, it can still be hard to witness, or to see the aftermath.  I try to remind myself that predators have babies to feed, too. But I wouldn’t blame you at all for trying to protect your friend Mary.  First, I have to ask, are you sure there are any eggs or ducklings left to save? I don’t know about mallards specifically, but female birds that are brooding will often continue to sit on the nest for a few days even after all the eggs have been stolen or destroyed.  Probably, the hormones that control the behavior take a little bit of time to subside.  So it’s possible that even if she’s still sitting, it’s too late to do anything to help.

The second thing I have to ask is, are you sure the predator wasn’t your own dog?  Dogs do like eggs, after all.  And as you said, your dog knew where the nest was.  Obviously, if there is any possibility that your dog is the predator, the simple answer is to keep your dog away from the nest.  But assuming it was not your dog, I don’t know that there’s much you could do.  Most of the typical duck nest predators – such as raccoons, coyotes, foxes – would be pretty hard to keep out in any way that didn’t imprison the hen.  If you tried to put a fence around the nest, it would have to be pretty high to keep a fox out, and raccoons can climb over almost anything.  I guess you could try a heavy covered wooden box, but that might just stress the hen to an extreme.

I’m afraid I don’t have a good solution.  The only good news I can offer is that nest predation is a common occurrence and when a nest has been destroyed, mallard hens usually start over, typically within a week. Hopefully, Mary will try again and she’ll have better luck.

mallard tipped up

mallard feeding

4. Are mallard drakes the worst creatures in the world? I was at a lake and was upset to see a female duck surrounded by 7-9 male ducks pecking her and nearly drowning her. She was so tired and was shaking in shock. My family told me not to be silly, it was just nature. But I am worried that she didn’t survive. Why do the males make such horrible attacks?

Submitted by: Karen, UK

Karen, I sympathize with your distress. It is pretty traumatic to watch, to be sure.  I wrote about why this happens in ducks at http://askanaturalist.com/why-are-these-mallard-males-beating-up-this-female/.  I’m not really sure I have much to add to that explanation.

However, it is important to remember that some of what we see is “unnatural” behavior that occurs in parks that have an overabundance of mallards. And I read an article recently about a study of the “divorce rate” in birds.  This is the rate at which mated pairs separate and pair up with new mates.  http://wuky.org/post/introducing-divorce-rate-birds-and-guess-which-bird-never-ever-divorces. Here’s a quote from that article: “Ducks do better than humans. Human marriages (American ones) fail at a rate of roughly 40 percent … Mallard marriages are 91 percent successful.”

So oddly enough, mallard matings in the wild are more stable than those of people.  Not sure how much consolation that is, but that’s all I’ve got.

mallard pair

mallard pair

5. Are mallard drakes the most loyal widowers in the world? A mallard drake has remained by his dead mate for the last five days. Initially I thought I would bury her when he left … perhaps I should just do it? She is beside my pond and attracting flies.

Submitted by: Sarah, UK

Sarah, awww, that’s sad … and a different side of the “horrible rapist mallard drake” picture.  I don’t really know how long the drake will stay there.  But probably not much longer, and the sooner the female is gone, the sooner he’ll move on.  I think burying it would be a nice thing to do.

Sources:

Black, J.M., 1996, Partnership in Birds, the Study of Monogamy, Oxford University Press, Oxford.

Drilling, N., Titman, R., and McKinney, F., The Birds of North America Online, CORNELL LAB OF ORNITHOLOGY and the AMERICAN ORNITHOLOGISTS’ UNION,http://bna.birds.cornell.edu/bna/species/658/articles/breeding

Cite this article as: Pelletier, TC. (December 23, 2014). Ducky questions Retrieved from http://askanaturalist.com/ducky-questions/ on April 18, 2015.

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What is this bright green string of eggs? – Part 3

This is part three in a three-part series about photos of bright green eggs first submitted to AskaNaturalist.com in the summer of 2014. The photos came from a reader in Nova Scotia and another in Maine. To read part 1, click here. To read part 2, click here.

string of green eggs and tape measure

Nova Scotia “string of bright green eggs”

egg string - maine - 800

Maine “jelly blob”

Previously on “bright green string of eggs”: Two independently submitted strings of bright green eggs or something like eggs, from Nova Scotia and Maine, July-Aug 2014. In Part I, we considered amphibian eggs, algae and snails. In Part II, we rejected all those possibilities and came around to chironomids – insects known as “non-biting midges.” Some chironomid species lay their eggs in water in gelatinous, spirally organized egg mass strings that look similar to the Nova Scotia and Maine eggs. There was a nagging problem, however, in that in two cases where someone hatched out one of these egg masses, the hatchlings had six legs, whereas the larvae of chironomids are legless.

Still we decided chironomids was the best answer … but wait ….

Chironomid larvae with legs?: There are strong similarities between these egg masses and those of some chironomids, as the photo at the GoldFish Garage site shows (covered in part 2, click here to go to Goldfish Garage). But the photos Nancy from Maine had taken of her hatchlings clearly showed six legs – and chironomid larvae don’t have legs. That incongruity made me hesitant to declare victory and write up the chironomid answer. So I kept stalling …

Then, just when I finally decided I had to write it up and move on, I got a message from Charley Eiseman, who contributes to BugGuide.net and who has his own insect-related blog called Bug Tracks. Charley is a naturalist and author who co-wrote Tracks & Sign of Insects and Other Invertebrates. His book is on my Christmas wish list and I’ll do a review of it once I have it in hand. It sounds uniquely useful.

Charley responded to a photo I had placed on BugGuide.net weeks before that showed the egg mass and the hatchlings and asked for confirmation that the egg mass was chironomid. Charley’s response to my photo post said, “Well, as far as I know, donut-shaped egg masses are unique to caddisflies in the genus Phryganea. Also, chironomids, like most flies, have elongate eggs, whereas these are spherical, which is typical of caddisflies.”

I read this with great excitement because Charley’s identification would explain the six-legged hatchlings.

Adult Phryganea caddisfly

Adult Phryganea caddisfly

Caddisflies are insects that share with chironomids the trait of having their larvae develop in bodies of fresh water. Although the larvae of some of the approximately 12,000 caddisfly species are predatory, most caddisfly larvae feed on detritus, plant material, and algae. The Caddisfly order (Trichoptera) is related to the order that includes moths and butterflies (Lepidoptera), and you can see that resemblance in moth-like adult caddisflies and also in the fact that the juveniles go through a pupal stage the way that moths and butterflies do. In the case of caddisflies, the pupa is formed underwater, and the adult crawls out, floats to the surface and flies away. After the adults mate in the summer, they lay their eggs in the water. And some caddisflies in the genera Phryganea and Agrypnia lay strings of gelatinous, spirally organized egg masses that are characteristically looped or donut-shaped.

And the larvae, when they hatch, have six legs!

Phryganea caddisfly larvae

Phryganea caddisfly larvae

The larvae of most species build a long thin house by using silk to attach plant material, sand and other objects together. The larva crawls inside and wears the house pretty much round the clock nonstop until it is ready to pupate. The fact that they are very uncomfortable out of their house is shown in this somewhat humorous video of two caddisfly larvae competing for the same house: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h-9Lu9f5tEE. You can read my previous article about caddisflies by clicking here.

To make what has been a long story a little bit shorter, after checking with a couple of caddisfly experts and looking at illustrations of caddisfly egg masses that seem very similar to those of the egg masses from Nova Scotia and Maine (as well as the ones I came across from Vermont and Montreal), I am prepared to say that Charley’s diagnosis of caddisfly eggs best fits all the evidence.

One key piece of evidence is that, as Charley said in his BugGuide.net response, chironomid eggs are nearly always elongated or oval shaped. Caddisfly eggs, on the other hand, are nearly always spherical. And now, if we go back to the eggs from GoldFish Garage, and zoom in, you’ll see they are elongated.

egg masses from Nova Scotia and Maine

The eggs in our Nova Scotia and Maine egg masses, on the other hand, are spherical, as shown in this zoomed in photo.

Maine’s list of caddisflies includes several species in the genus Agrypnia and Phryganea, as does Nova Scotia’s. We don’t know for sure the two egg masses came from the same species, of course. The egg masses of such closely related species probably look very similar.

But having confirmed that there are Agrypnia and Phryganea species in Maine and Nova Scotia, I am finally, at long last, confident in saying that the egg masses submitted by Emily in Nova Scotia and Nancy in Maine (as well as the eggs from Vermont on Robyn’s Pond Page) are almost certainly caddisfly eggs.

Phew! This was a fun one for me, but I apologize to Emily and Nancy, who had to wait so long for an answer.

Tying up loose ends:

Snails – “But what about the snails?” you might ask. Remember that the person who found the similar egg mass in Montreal insists that baby snails hatched from it. As we’ve seen, two not very closely related insect groups have evolved very similar egg masses, so it’s not out of the realm of possibility that a group of snails have also evolved a similar egg mass, as Rob Dillon discusses in his blog posts about this same subject. As far as I can tell, there are no snails known to lay this kind of egg mass, however, so I’m inclined to suggest that the baby snails were hitchhikers. I feel a tad hypocritical in saying this, because when the same kind of explanation was offered for the presence of six-legged larvae coming from an egg mass that was supposed to be chironomids (the larvae of which don’t have legs), I strongly disagreed. But I have only a third-hand connection to the person who had snail hatchlings, so I’m more willing to discount that observation. I don’t know where the snails came from, but I don’t think it was from the egg masses.

Size of egg masses – One of the reasons it was hard to accept chironomids as the layers of these egg masses is the size of the egg masses compared to adult midges. As the ruler included by Emily in her photo of the egg mass from Nova Scotia, these egg masses are more than two inches (5 cm) long. Although a few of the larger chironomid species can be 10 mm (3/8 inch), most are smaller than that. It was hard to imagine how a female chironomid adult could lay something so much larger than itself. Agrypnia and Phryganea caddisflies are considerably larger, up to 25 mm (1 in.) in length, but still the egg masses are considerably larger than the caddisfly female who lays it. It turns out that in both the chironomids and the caddisflies, the eggs are laid with only a sort of chemical latticework, which begins to swell as soon as it hits water, forming the tough gel that protects the eggs.

Academic opportunity – I lost track of how many people told me, “Hardly anyone studies the eggs.” Or “Very little is known about the eggs.” I heard this about freshwater snails, about chironomids and about caddisflies. If there’s a young biologist out there who is looking for an area in which to add to our knowledge of nature, this would be an easy area in which to make a permanent mark. I’m planning to look for egg masses myself next summer and hatch some out. I’ll keep you posted.

That striking green color – One other mystery remains. Why are some of these eggs so green? In nature, that bright green color is almost always a sign of chlorophyll. In some species of amphibians, the eggs have a symbiotic relationship with algae. The microscopic algae benefit by living in the protection of the egg mass gel. The eggs benefit because the algae release oxygen, something that is critical to eggs that are stuck in the deep middle of an egg mass. Oxygen diffuses through the mass from the water, but if you can get a little extra from some symbiotic algae, it’s a bonus.

So is that what’s happening with these bright green caddisfly eggs? Are they symbiotic with algae? And the green chironomid eggs as well? And why were Nancy’s eggs green the first time she saw them and more brown the second time. As far as I can tell, no one has studied this. Another opportunity for a biologist to take up.

Two mysteries with one answer – When Charley Eiseman was poking around on AskaNaturalist.com, he came across another article I wrote: “Donut blob that stumped the experts ….” This was about a gelatinous donut-shaped object a reader found in a Maine lake. Charley offered the possibility that the translucent donut might be what’s left of a caddisfly egg mass once the larvae have hatched and crawled away to build their little houses. This is by far the most reasonable explanation I’ve heard for this donut blob and I’m inclined to think that Charley has solved that mystery as well. Caddisflies are everywhere!

Thank yous: Thank you to Rob Dillon for all his help and his interest in this case, which helped keep me pushing for a good answer. Thanks also to Charley Eiseman for the answer to the mystery, Alexander Huryn, aquatic ecologist at the University of Alabama, who also suggested caddisflies, and to caddisfly experts John Morse at Clemson University, David Houghton at Hillsdale College and Ralph Holzenthal at the University of Minnesota for help in providing evidence that supports the Phryganea/Agrypnia caddisfly answer. I also greatly appreciate help with chironomids from Professor Ali Arshad at the University of Florida, independent chironomid expert John Epler, David at GoldFish Garage, Bohdan Bilyj, and Jon Martin at the University of Melbourne.

Thank you also, to Robyn Rhudy at FishPondInfo.com and J. Trevor Vennata, who studies snails at the University of Minnesota.

Sources:

http://digitalcommons.library.umaine.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1163&context=aes_techbulletin, The Caddisflies (Trichoptera) of Maine, Excepting the Family Hydroptilidae, R. L. Blickle and W. J. Morse, Bulletin T-24 November 1966.

Wiggins, G. (1998). The caddisfly family Phryganeidae (Trichoptera). Toronto: Published in association with NRC Research Press, Canada Institute for Scientific and Technical Information by University of Toronto Press.

Rasmussen, A.K., & Morse, J.C. 2014. Distributional Checklist of Nearctic Trichoptera (Summer 2014 Revision). Unpublished, Florida A&M University, Tallahassee. 487 pp.  [Available at http://www.Trichoptera.org]

Hinton, H.E. 1981. Biology of Insect Eggs. 3 volumes. Pergamon Press, Oxford.

Hickin, N. (1968). Caddis larvae; larvae of the British Trichoptera. Rutherford [N.J.: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press.

Frost, S. (1959). Insect life and insect natural history (2d rev. ed.). New York: Dover Publications.

Cite this article as: Pelletier, TC. (December 19, 2014). What is this bright green string of eggs? – Part 3 Retrieved from http://askanaturalist.com/what-is-this-bright-green-string-of-eggs-part-3/ on April 18, 2015.

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What is this bright green string of eggs? – Part 2

This is part two in a three-part series about photos of bright green eggs first submitted to AskaNaturalist.com in the summer of 2014. The photos came from a reader in Nova Scotia and another in Maine. To read part 1, click here. To read part 3, click here.

string of green eggs and tape measure

Nova Scotia “string of bright green eggs”

egg string - maine - 800

Maine “jelly blob”

Previously on “bright green string of eggs”: Two independently submitted strings of bright green eggs or something like eggs, from Nova Scotia and Maine, July-Aug 2014. First thought was amphibians symbiotic with algae. Amphib expert says emphatically, “No!” He suggests algae. Algae expert says “No. Maybe snail eggs?” Rob Dillon, snail expert, says he received a similar photo several years ago, and the person who sent it hatched the eggs and got tiny baby Lymnaea (Bulimnea) megasoma, a freshwater snail of the northern United States and southern Canada.

So the answer to who laid these eggs: snails … but wait ….

Snails with legs?: Shortly after I sent the bright green string photos to professor Dillon, I was doing an image search for various combinations of green, string, eggs, etc. I came across this page: http://www.fishpondinfo.com/egg.htm, where Robyn Rhudy, who describes herself as “Specializing in Nature, Animals, Fish, and Ponds,” has some good information on how to identify various egg masses to be found in freshwater. When I emailed Robyn and asked if she knew what the egg masses from Nova Scotia and Maine were, she said she didn’t, but that she had seen something like this before. She directed me to the bottom of her page about the aquatic insects you can find in a backyard pond, where she describes how a reader sent her a photo and this message:

“I found some eggs in a neighbor’s pond today (July 25) here in central Vermont. The clear 3/8″ diameter strand is configured in a ring about the size of a hair elastic, with hundreds of tiny (salt grain size) green dots in a very orderly spiral pattern along the strand. The ring was attached to a submerged rock and is very elastic….”

“The diameter of the elastic band (which does not break up when handled and will stretch to fit over my hand) is about 1/4″ – 3/8″ when un-stretched. It is about the size of a hair elastic but thicker. It is hard to tell how big the actual egg white part is because they are arranged in a ring and not separate. And the coil of green dots is very uniform and regular. As you can see, I’ve scraped the strand off the rock and have it in a jar to see what hatches….”

This description matches the two bright green strings I previously described in Part 1, including the key fact of coming from the northeastern US/Southeastern Canada region. The only difference is that in the photo submitted to FishPondInfo, the string is less green and more brownish. And the key thing is that when Robyn’s reader hatched the eggs, she drew a picture of what hatched. The creature she drew has six legs and a long abdomen. Definitely not a snail. The only creatures on this earth with six legs are insects, and the drawing looks like many aquatic insect larvae.

chironomus midge

Chironomid midge

With this new information, I renewed my search, but in an insect direction. I soon latched onto the chironomids as a possible source for the gelatinous, spirally organized egg mass . The family Chironomidae includes at least 20,000 species of small flies found worldwide. Chironomids are in the suborder Nematocera, which also includes our all-too-familiar mosquitoes and blackflies as well as midges. Unlike many other midges, however, chironomids don’t bite. In fact, they are often descriptively called “non-biting midges” and many chironomids probably don’t feed at all as adults. That doesn’t mean they don’t annoy people, however. Chrironomids are famous for hatching simultaneously in plague-like numbers from some bodies of water, to the extent that they cover surfaces and ruin summer lakefront parties, and when they die simultaneously, they can form smelly piles of tiny rotting corpses.

Before we wish these tiny creatures off our lovely planet, however, we should acknowledge that the enormous numbers of chironomid larvae, feeding on detritus and microscopic organisms, form a key link in the food chains of nearly every body of freshwater on the globe. They can survive in clean water and they help to clean dirty water. Many species that live in low oxygen conditions in mud have a kind of hemoglobin in their body fluid that helps them pull oxygen from the water. Because hemoglobin makes their transparent bodies look pink or red, these larvae are often called “bloodworms” when they are sold as food for aquarium fish.

In fact, as I looked for confirmation that these egg masses were laid by chironomids of some kind, I came across this photo on the website of someone who raises goldfish as a hobby: http://goldfishgarage.blogspot.com/2014/05/chironomid-bloodworm-egg-mass.html.

On that site, there is a photo of egg mass that looks very similar, in that it has spirally arranged eggs in a gelatinous string. It’s not exactly the same, but it seemed close enough to offer support for the chironomid idea. And when I asked David, who runs GoldfishGarage.com, he confirmed that he raises chironomids in his garage, as “bloodworm” food for his goldfish.

On his site, David also has a great video that shows the egg mass developing and tiny “bloodworm” chironomid larvae hatching. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VtNB6wYzas4#t=115.

Score one for chironomids as the layers of the Nova Scotia and Maine egg masses.

For confirmation, I sent the photos of the Nova Scotia and Maine egg masses to a handful of chironomid experts and asked for their opinions. The answers ranged from “probably” to “definitely!” with the consensus leaning toward the genus Chironomus. And an image search for “Chironomus egg mass” shows several photos of egg masses that look like David’s Goldfish Garage photo and very similar to the egg masses from Nova Scotia and Maine and from Robyn’s Pond Page.

Maine egg mass with hatchlings

Maine egg mass hatching

Ali Arshad, one of the chironomid experts I contacted, suggested that I write back to the AskaNaturalist readers who submitted the egg mass photos and ask them to put them in a bucket and see what hatches. I didn’t hear back from Emily in Nova Scotia, but Nancy from Maine was cheerfully willing to create a nursery for hundreds of mystery insects. She said the original egg mass had been put back in the lake, but she collected another one from her dock. And when it began to hatch a few days later, Nancy sent me this photo:

And that’s when the chironomid train went off the rails.

closeup of hatchling

hatchling

If you zoom in on one of the dozens of hatchlings coming from Nancy’s egg mass, you’ll see this:

The resolution is not great, but what is clear is that this tiny creature has six legs! But if you watch David’s video of chironomids hatching and look very closely, you’ll see that the larvae that hatch from his eggs – like all chironomid larvae – don’t have legs. They are long and skinny and have stumpy fake legs called parapods.

When I zoomed in and saw six legs on Nancy’s hatchlings, I knew these were definitely not chironomid larvae. And then I realized I should have paid more attention to the drawing that had been submitted to Robyn’s Pond Page, because it too has six legs. In fact, that’s what led me to think the egg masses belonged to insects in the first place. And the drawing is a reasonable representation of Nancy’s tiny hatchling.

I presented the six-legged evidence to chironomid experts who had expressed confidence that the eggs were chironomid, but while they agreed that the six-legged hatchlings were not chironomid larvae, they suggested that maybe the six-leggers were “hitchhikers” that didn’t really belong to the egg mass.

I wasn’t comfortable with that explanation because there were so many “hitchhikers” on Nancy’s egg mass, and for a while, I toyed with the idea that the six-legged hitchhikers were actually feeding on the egg mass. In fact, it occurred to me that maybe that could explain both the six-legged larvae coming from a chironomid egg mass and also explain how someone got baby snails from a similar egg mass (Remember the snails? If not, see Part 1). Maybe the snails were also feeding on the egg mass. None of the chironomid experts I contacted seemed to think much of that idea, however, so I dropped it and reluctantly accepted that these had to be chironomid egg masses.

I put aside the distracting detail of six-legged hatchlings, and prepared to make my determination: Chironomids it is …

But Wait, There is Another Possibility: In the third and final installment of this story, we find out that there is yet another possibility for who laid these egg masses, and it explains the six-legged larvae.

Sources: Sources and thank yous are at the end of Part III, coming soon …

Cite this article as: Pelletier, TC. (December 17, 2014). What is this bright green string of eggs? – Part 2 Retrieved from http://askanaturalist.com/what-is-this-bright-green-string-of-eggs-part-2/ on April 18, 2015.

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