Category Archives: Uncategorized

Why is a Robin Hovering Around a Cardinal’s Nest?

This site is supported by donations. If you find the information helpful or interesting, please click here to make a small contribution (credit card or PayPal). Thank you!

The Question: We have a bird nest in our backyard that was made by a cardinal. Recently, we noticed that a robin seems to be hovering around the cardinals’ nest. The cardinals seem upset by this, and seem to work as a team to keep the robin at bay. Can you explain what is going on?

Submitted by: Laura R.

Continue reading Why is a Robin Hovering Around a Cardinal’s Nest?

Burrowing Crayfish

This site is supported by donations. If you find the information helpful or interesting, please click here to make a small contribution (credit card or PayPal). Thank you!

The Question: What kind of animal builds a 3-4 inches (8-10 cm) high mound of mud balls with a 1 inch (2.5 cm) hole in the top? They look like mini volcanoes. I have found a couple of these in a swampy area near a river. I live in Michigan.

Submitted by: Debbie, MI

Continue reading Burrowing Crayfish

Why Don’t Ducks’ Feet Freeze?

This site is supported by donations. If you find the information helpful or interesting, please click here to make a small contribution (credit card or PayPal). Thank you!

The Question:
Why don’t the feet of a duck  (seagull, goose, or other winter bird) freeze when they spend the night apparently sleeping on ice in sub-zero temperatures?  Also, do you know if they stand on one foot and then the other going back and forth as a strategy to help with this?

Submitted by: Ken L., Milwaukee, WI

Continue reading Why Don’t Ducks’ Feet Freeze?

Are Snakes Useful?

This site is supported by donations. If you find the information helpful or interesting, please click here to make a small contribution (credit card or PayPal). Thank you!

The Question:Are snakes useful to humans?  And what role do they play in nature?

Submitted by: John L., Texas (John found three beautiful rat snakes when he lifted a tarp on some stored wood. When he posted his photos on FaceBook with enthusiasm, he was shocked that so many people responded by saying, “Kill them!!” Thanks to John for the picture printed below.)

Continue reading Are Snakes Useful?

Where Does Trash End Up?

I was very much affected by these photos in the latest issue of Audubon Magazine: http://www.audubonmagazine.org/onepicture/onepicture1003.html. For some reason, they reproduced it in a small, low-res format. To see a better version, go to this pdf and go to page 21 of this presentation: http://faculty.philau.edu/AshleyJ/Philly_U_MD_Bamford.pdf (if you want to get really depressed, read the whole presentation.)

If you’ve ever wondered whether a little trash makes any difference, this picture gives a moving answer. The bottle caps, cigarette lighters, and hundreds of other pieces of trash that killed this albatross may have come from half way around the world. Albatross will scoop up just about anything they see on the surface of the ocean because in pre-plastic days, virtually anything floating on the ocean was food. Also, apparently, flying fish lay their eggs in long strings attached to floating objects, and albatross feed on them by scooping up whatever they see floating. Then they go back and regurgitate to their chicks. Unfortunately, all the plastic junk the parents have ingested ends up in the chicks. In this case, it was enough to kill the chick.

These photos are a tragic demonstration of the interconnectedness of our environment. Every bottle cap or plastic bag we throw away on the sidewalk can end up washing into a storm grate, into a river, out into the ocean, and eventually into the gut of an albatross chick.

This site is supported by donations. If you find the information helpful or interesting, please click here to make a small contribution (credit card or PayPal). Thank you!

Cite this article as: Pelletier, TC. (April 19, 2010). Where Does Trash End Up? Retrieved from http://askanaturalist.com/where-does-trash-end-up/ on November 19, 2017.